18339662We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Release Date: May 13, 2014
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Source: Netgalley
Rating: starstarstarstarblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart.
Read it.
And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.– Goodreads

Review:

It’s hard to talk about this novel, and not just because I was told to lie. I read We Were Liars on my phone kindle app from Phoenix to Philadelphia and while I was inhaling it, I was emailing Tina going “YOU. MUST.READ.THIS.NOW” because I needed to discuss it with someone. Anyone. Which again, is hard to do when you are told to lie about it. Of course Tina didn’t get all the emails until I landed and got a lot of !!!!!!. :|||||| !!!!!!! WTF DID I JUST READ emails.

I found this book to be a force to be reckoned with. It was a punch to the gut and made me have feels I didn’t know Be6zCxMIUAAJYNTwere possible. Important things to know about We Were Liars:

  • Think old money (a la the Kennedy’s)
  • Co-dependent family (with the ~outsider, who questions their small limited world view…a lot)
  • A unique romance in the sense, do you want them together? do you want them separate? WHO WILL KNOW
  • The aristocracy of the main four characters who come from a co-dependent family that has old money.

Even with those four bullet points, I would have never, ever picked up this novel if I was at home surrounded by my owned books. But on a plane, where I didn’t have a book, I was thrilled to find this on my kindle app as I was approved from Netgalley, I was thrilled I had this. It’s twisted. It’s fucked up. You’ll love that a character calls out most of the main characters for being sheltered and favored. Lockhart’s writing is an almost poetic style which will have it’s critics, but to me, it worked, and worked well. It packed a punch and impacted me in multiple ways. The gap between the older generation and the younger generation also seemed painfully true, particularly with the aristocrat background Lockhart was working with.

I understand that this review doesn’t give much, to anything, at all, but really. This needs to be read, and needs to be read now.