23467595The Truth about Twinkie Pie
by Kat Yeh
Release Date: January 25, 2015
Publisher: Little, Brown BFYR
Source: Audiobook from Library!
Rating: starstarstarstarblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

“A quirky, heartwarming coming-of-age debut novel about a girl who s out of her element but up for the challenge”

Take two sisters making it on their own: brainy twelve-year-old GiGi (short for Galileo Galilei, a name she never says out loud) and junior-high-dropout-turned-hairstylist DiDi (short for Delta Dawn). Add a million dollars in prize money from a national cooking contest and a move from the trailer parks of South Carolina to the Gold Coast of New York. Mix in a fancy new school, new friends and enemies, a first crush, and a generous sprinkling of family secrets.

That s the recipe for “The Truth about Twinkie Pie,” a voice-driven middle grade debut about the true meaning of family and friendship.” – Goodreads

Review:

The Truth About Twinkie Pie is a stellar middle grade novel that just made my heart warm and fuzzy. It’s about a girl who learns to grow and yet stay the same. It’s a story that broke my heart (because she has a sister who loves her so much) and made me laugh all at the same time. This book has everything that is A++ in books: complex characters, complex family relationships, real life issues and is completely relatable. It also has strong female friendships! Which is something, as you know, is very close to me.

GiGi is a girl from the south and she’s proud of that. She misses her mom and loves that her sister watches over her. DiDi, her older sister is trying her hardest to have GiGi grow up to be a solid person meant for the world. Never once did I question how much DiDi loved her sister. GiGi could drive her crazy and up the wall, but there was always trust and love between the two of them. I also enjoyed how Yeh shows that just because someone’s life looks perfect doesn’t mean it is. Her friends all look like they all have these “perfect” lives, but they are struggling with her.

GiGi considers her sister to be stifling and overbearing her sister is just loving her the only way she knows how. She’s convinced everyone is judging her and they’re not. They’re worried about their own lives, but when you’re in middle school that’s not how your brain works. I get that. I also get that no matter how much you love someone, you sometimes feel like you need a break from someone. Or even find someone that actually listens to you when you’re surrounded by people who mean well, but don’t listen.

This book really is everything. It’s enjoyable. It’s heartbreaking. It makes you think. It’s a must read.