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Tag Archives: publisher: delacorte

18982137The Trouble with Destiny by Lauren Morrill
Release Date: December 8, 2015
Publisher: Delacorte
Source: Netgalley
Rating: starstarblank_starblank_starblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey…

With her trusty baton and six insanely organized clipboards, drum major Liza Sanders is about to take Destiny by storm—the boat, that is. When Liza discovered that her beloved band was losing funding, she found Destiny, a luxury cruise ship complete with pools, midnight chocolate buffets, and a $25,000 spring break talent show prize.

Liza can’t imagine senior year without the band, and nothing will distract her from achieving victory. She’s therefore not interested when her old camp crush, Lenny, shows up on board, looking shockingly hipster-hot. And she’s especially not interested in Russ, the probably-as-dumb-as-he-is-cute prankster jock whose ex, Demi, happens be Liza’s ex–best friend and leader of the Athenas, a show choir that’s the band’s greatest competition.

But it’s not going to be smooth sailing. After the Destiny breaks down, all of Liza’s best-laid plans start to go awry. Liza likes to think of herself as an expert at almost everything, but when it comes to love, she’s about to find herself lost at sea– Goodreads

Review:
The Trouble with Destiny was an exhausting book. The main character is an anxious filled band leader who I thought I would love, but instead felt “meh” about for 80% of the book. I have no problem with anxiety driven characters. I adore Cath in Fangirl. Heck, I am my own anxiety driven character (my friends can all agree to this). But something about Liza didn’t work for me. I spent a good portion of this book wanting to tell her to breathe. And to be honest with people. And to breathe.

Liza believed carrying the weight of the world on her shoulders would save the world. Which I understand. I get that side of Liza. But I have friends who tell me to breathe. And to relax. But no one told Liza to pause. Breathe. Enjoy the fact that she’s on a cruise ship with some of her favorite people!

One thing that Morrill did that I adored was the fact that not everything is how it seems. And that sometimes it’s important to see it from someone else’s point of view. Something that needs to be discussed and thought about more.

I thought I would love and adore The Trouble with Destiny. I was mistaken! Although I’m a fan of Morrill’s previous work; The Trouble with Destiny fell extremely flat for me. From one note characters, to stereotypes I already have read enough of The Trouble with Destiny was not the cruise ship fun I thought it would be. It was a Final Destination ride I was dying to get off of.


18692431Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Release Date: September 1, 2015
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Source: ALAMW 2015
Rating: starstarstarstarblank_star (4.5)
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

This innovative, heartfelt debut novel tells the story of a girl who’s literally allergic to the outside world. When a new family moves in next door, she begins a complicated romance that challenges everything she’s ever known. The narrative unfolds via vignettes, diary entries, texts, charts, lists, illustrations, and more.

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster. – Goodreads

Review:

I went into this book knowing it had a lot of buzz. What that buzz didn’t tell me was how perfect the drawings were or how perfect Madeline was because she’s flawed, she lives in a bubble with only her mom and her nurse, but she’s real. Not once in Everything, Everything did I think “Oh. Madeline. She’s so cardboard cutout.” She was constantly more than that. Madeline also lead me to second guess a lot of things. Relationships, the life you’ve been living being safe.

Everything, Everything also made me question forgiveness, growth. What it means to be an adult. How friendships change, even those who are convinced will never change. Madeline and her mother are characters I want everyone to know about because their relationship was so authentically real. Between them being close, but also with Madeline growing up and apart from her mother.

You know those perfect books that are next to impossible to describe? That’s Everything, Everything to me. This book had everything: a character finding herself, a really good relationship with her mother, a really good relationship with the literal boy next door, a good relationship with her nurse. There was so many good portions I had to give up trying to pick the right quotes for this review because there were just too many of them. Ones that made me laugh, ones that made me sad (because I related to them), ones that made me have the swoons. Everything, Everything really is..everything.


keeperWe Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Release Date: May 13, 2014
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Source: NetGalley
Rating: starstarstarblank_starblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.
 
We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart. 

Read it.
And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.

Review:
This book. Everyone raves about it, everyone loves it, but it left me feeling grumpy. I knew there was a twist, since in the beginning, there’s a note asking you not to reveal it to anyone who asks. So I was expecting some kind of M. Night Shyamalan moment, and I ended up sort of seeing it coming, but not really. But despite my misgivings with the twist, I read this book in about twelve hours, and it was engrossing and interesting. It was a quick read, no ponderous plot moments, no bad pacing. Lockhart is a great writer, and this is a huge departure from her Ruby Oliver novels (which everyone loves, myself included). Cady’s narration has a dreamy quality, making the summers on Beechwood seem somehow ethereal but also very real. Nothing seems entirely solid, as if events and places and even people change depending on the angle. Cady relies on these dreamy memories, however, because she needs to reconstruct her sense of self after her “accident.”

Let me tell you why I put “accident” in quotes. The Sinclairs are perfect. They are old-money, reminiscent at times of the Kennedys, American royalty. They are white, blonde, and beautiful, and they are surrounded by mystery and admiration. They summer on a private island, where each of the three Sinclair sisters have their own house. They are also torn apart by worry, because each sister wants their father’s estate for her own. These women are highly educated, all divorced, and do not work. They rely on their father, Harris Sinclair, who is manipulative and cruel, playing his daughters against each other. Harris isn’t really alone in being unlikable though; none of the Sinclairs are likable or relatable, from the patriarch down to the smallest Sinclair child. They are privileged, they are spoiled, and they are in their own little materialistic bubble. It’s hard to get close to them, partly because we don’t get any real character depth. Stuck in Cady’s head as we are (and she is the very definition of an unreliable narrator), we only see what she sees, and she doesn’t really know her family. They only see each other during the summer, on this private island, and they lose touch during the year. When they are together, they follow the Sinclair family rules: never show painful emotion, do not discuss loss, smile, act normal, have a picnic. Granny Tipper dies early in the novel, and the Sinclairs simply do not mention her at all. As Cady’s mother says in chapter 11 of the digital ARC, “Silence is a protective coating over pain.” So I wrote “accident” as I did because Cady has amnesia and can’t remember what happened at all, and we can’t trust anything the Sinclairs say about pretty much anything.

The Liars (and we never really are told why the family calls them this) are Cady, and her cousins Johnny and Mirren, and Johnny’s friend, Gat. Gat is the nephew of one Sinclair sister’s Indian boyfriend, who Harris and his wife do not approve of. Cady opens the book as a nearly eighteen-year-old who still calls her mother “Mummy,” Johnny is flippant and materialistic, Mirren is flighty and irritable, and Gat is an outsider. He is a little anarchist in the making, which endeared him to me a lot, and he is absolutely not of the Sinclair lifestyle. He sometimes tries to get the Sinclair cousins to see their privilege, to question what they’ve always taken for granted, but they are either unwilling or incapable to do so. After her accident, Cady is absent from Beechwood for two years, and when she returns, things are the same, but not quite. The main house has been renovated, everyone is getting along, and Harris’ mental state is in decline. Things are confusing for both Cady and the reader, and we discover things slowly, as Cady does.

But don’t worry. I won’t reveal the ending.


18339662We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Release Date: May 13, 2014
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Source: Netgalley
Rating: starstarstarstarblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart.
Read it.
And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.– Goodreads

Review:

It’s hard to talk about this novel, and not just because I was told to lie. I read We Were Liars on my phone kindle app from Phoenix to Philadelphia and while I was inhaling it, I was emailing Tina going “YOU. MUST.READ.THIS.NOW” because I needed to discuss it with someone. Anyone. Which again, is hard to do when you are told to lie about it. Of course Tina didn’t get all the emails until I landed and got a lot of !!!!!!. :|||||| !!!!!!! WTF DID I JUST READ emails.

I found this book to be a force to be reckoned with. It was a punch to the gut and made me have feels I didn’t know Be6zCxMIUAAJYNTwere possible. Important things to know about We Were Liars:

  • Think old money (a la the Kennedy’s)
  • Co-dependent family (with the ~outsider, who questions their small limited world view…a lot)
  • A unique romance in the sense, do you want them together? do you want them separate? WHO WILL KNOW
  • The aristocracy of the main four characters who come from a co-dependent family that has old money.

Even with those four bullet points, I would have never, ever picked up this novel if I was at home surrounded by my owned books. But on a plane, where I didn’t have a book, I was thrilled to find this on my kindle app as I was approved from Netgalley, I was thrilled I had this. It’s twisted. It’s fucked up. You’ll love that a character calls out most of the main characters for being sheltered and favored. Lockhart’s writing is an almost poetic style which will have it’s critics, but to me, it worked, and worked well. It packed a punch and impacted me in multiple ways. The gap between the older generation and the younger generation also seemed painfully true, particularly with the aristocrat background Lockhart was working with.

I understand that this review doesn’t give much, to anything, at all, but really. This needs to be read, and needs to be read now.


In a weird turn of event, I started to DNF books this month. Because of that, I am going to do a round up this month, because maybe you read one and enjoyed one and could tell me WHAT DID I MISSSS?!

crownThe Ring & The Crown by Melissa De La Cruz
Release Date: April 1, 2014
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
Source: NetGalley

DNF at 7% I lost interest. I found nothing fascinating about this book no matter how hard I tried. And I should of! History! England! Unfortunately all I know is one day I put it down for another book and I never came back to it.

maze The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Release Date: October 6, 2009
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Source: Library

The IT book of the past so many years, and this year with the movie coming out. Finally I decided to read it. And I was bored. I ended at Chapter 17 because there was so much information and none of it was fascinating to me. I understand that was part of the mystery to the story, but I needed something to keep me hooked and none of that was there. Which is why I put it down and sent it back to the library. I didn’t care to see where the story kept going.

royal

Royally Lost by Angie Stanton
Release Date: May 6, 2014
Publisher: Harper Collins
Source: Edelweiss

DNF at 34% was not grabbing my attention. Went to the end to see how it ended, but I really didn’t care. Which is weird for me when it comes to something like this. Royals! Europe! Wisconsin! But I got bored. Hated most of what was going on. Only went to the end to make sure it ended how I thought it would. I think it will be a good book for the right person. That person wasn’t me at this time. 17684323

The Break-Up Artist by Philip Siegel
Release Date: April 29, 2014
PublisherHarlequin Teen
Source: Netgalley

DNF at 18%. There was nothing wrong with this book persay. I was just bored and life is too short I’ve decided for boring books. This is a book I may pick up at a later date, but at the moment it did not hold that special spark for me.

18049000

Hung Up by Kristen Tracy
Release Date: March 4, 2014
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Source: Library

I love stories that are told in unique ways. Meg Cabot’s stories told in all emails are my thing. So this story should have been gold for me. It wasn’t. I didn’t connect to either character and I didn’t care to connect to either one. Very upsetting for me.


18077836The Mark of the Dragonfly by Jaleigh Johnson
Release Date: March 25, 2104
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Source: Netgalley
Rating: DNF
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

Fans of The City of Ember will love The Mark of the Dragonfly, an adventure story set in a magical world that is both exciting and dangerous.
Piper has never seen the Mark of the Dragonfly until she finds the girl amid the wreckage of a caravan in the Meteor Fields.
The girl doesn’t remember a thing about her life, but the intricate tattoo on her arm is proof that she’s from the Dragonfly Territories and that she’s protected by the king. Which means a reward for Piper if she can get the girl home.

The one sure way to the Territories is the 401, a great old beauty of a train. But a ticket costs more coin than Piper could make in a year. And stowing away is a difficult prospect–everyone knows that getting past the peculiar green-eyed boy who stands guard is nearly impossible.
Life for Piper just turned dangerous. A little bit magical. And very exciting, if she can manage to survive the journey. – Goodreads

Review:

The Mark of the Dragonfly is the story of Piper, a girl who has never seen the Mark, and her life has been fine with that. Piper fixes things and she’s good at it and she is surviving that way. The only way she knows how. Then one day, when she is scavenging she comes upon a girl with the Mark and her life changes forever. Annnnnd that is where I ended.

This was a beautifully written book. Johnson’s prose is what kept me reading this book for as long as I did. Then I stopped and I realized for a few weeks I had not been reading it and I didn’t care to see where the story was going. While this is an amazing book for the right reader, it was not an amazing book for me. As I have stated in the past, I am trying to get better at not finishing books that I’m not interested in, and this sadly was one of them that I put down. One day I may be intrigued enough to come back to it but at the moment, I do not see that happening.


Untitled-1Being Sloane Jacobs by Lauren Morrill
Release Date: January 7, 2014
Publisher: Delacorte
Source: Netgalley//won hardcopy off of a twitter contest.
Rating: starstarstarstarblank_star
Buy It: Amazon | IndieBound

Meet Sloane Emily Jacobs: a seriously stressed-out figure-skater from Washington, D.C., who choked during junior nationals and isn’t sure she’s ready for a comeback. What she does know is that she’d give anything to escape the mass of misery that is her life.

Now meet Sloane Devon Jacobs, a spunky ice hockey player from Philly who’s been suspended from her team for too many aggressive hip checks. Her punishment? Hockey camp, now, when she’s playing the worst she’s ever played. If she messes up? Her life will be over.

When the two Sloanes meet by chance in Montreal and decide to trade places for the summer, each girl thinks she’s the lucky one: no strangers to judge or laugh at Sloane Emily, no scouts expecting Sloane Devon to be a hero. But it didn’t occur to Sloane E. that while avoiding sequins and axels she might meet a hockey hottie—and Sloane D. never expected to run into a familiar (and very good-looking) face from home. It’s not long before the Sloanes discover that convincing people you’re someone else might be more difficult than being yourself. – Goodreads

Review:

Some important facts to know about me: I love Disney channel movies and figure skating. This probably is reflected in my review of said novel.

The story starts out with Sloane E(mily), a figure skater with a loving yet slightly overbearing family who lives in DC. She’s dealing with her mother who wants her to be a star, her father is too busy worrying about his career in the Senate and then there is her brother James who doesn’t care about what his parents think and worries just about him (and Sloane). Her parents also are convinced she is MTB with this slimy boy who tried to molest her at an event. When she brings this up to her parents she is very much shut down because he comes from a good family that would give her father even more power.

After that dinner we meet Sloane D(evon). Sloane D, is a hockey player who enjoys a good fight. She’s so good at fighting, that her coach has had enough and benches her for the next three games of next season. Her family is completely different from Sloane E. Her mom isn’t currently in the picture, her family is lower to middle class and she has a secret: she can’t shoot a hockey puck. Her father is riding on hockey for her to have a future at college and she can’t shoot a puck. Her father try to be close, but her mother leaving cut her to the bone and Sloane D uses her words to cut her father and say things she can’t take back (something we’re all guilty of).

They both have something in common though: they want to be someone other than themselves.

Insert Hockey Camp! At hockey camp we learn that Sloane E saw something she shouldn’t have and her father is trying to pay her off. Which is just awkward. We learn that Sloane D is having a hard time with her mother leaving.

The story very much has a Parent Trap vibe to it. Which is not an insult from me. I love and adore that movie. There are just parts to it that are like the Parent Trap where it is hard to believe, even if Lindsay Lohan is playing you. That being said I felt for both Sloane’s even if for different reasons. Although their lives look “perfect” to the other from the outside they are clearly not. They both want to fit in and be accepted and that is hard no matter what age or what circumstances you are faced with.

A major circumstance is of course the two of them switching places. After a bonding moment showing each other various bruises (ouch) they decide this is it. They are going to do it. The two then fight misconceptions that they didn’t even know they had. The hockey star figures out that figure skating isn’t as easy as dancing on ice. There is stretching and practice and part of her body she didn’t even think could hurt. The figure skater finds out that hockey is

Sloane D, even finds a handful of people at skating camp that she even likes. Including Bee, a native to the area who shows Sloane an excellent bar with actual food and a very cute bartender. A bartender, Nando, who knows Sloane D from home. Her home. Not Sloane E’s home. Sloane E starts to figure out that lying to everyone is becoming harder and harder than she thought. Sloane E. also has a boy, a boy named Matt. Matt who is known around camp for being  a player that all the woman enjoys. Is this true? A boy, in a YA novel get a bad rap? Never.

This book is very realistic YA. Or as realistic as a Parent Trap-esque movie could be, but you know what I mean. There is love, and heartbreak and parts where it hurts to read, but being a teen is never easy. This was a solid YA read and exactly what I needed to start off 2014.